Two Hours on the Royal Mile: Part 2

We’re back for part two in Scotland’s great capital: Edinburgh. When I left last time I was talking about some of the witchy goings-on throughout Edinburgh’s past, and I want to leap right back into it. So here goes!

Brougham Castle

Head out to the outskirts of Penrith and you’ll find Brougham Castle, a medieval castle based on the site of the Roman fort of Brocavum. Very shortly after the land was acquired by Robert de Vieuxpoint in 1214, the castle was built to defend England from the Scots, and also at times from other members of the English nobility. The River Eamont which runs beside the castle used to mark the border between England and Scotland, before the boundary was moved further north by William Rufus in 1092.

Fontainebleau

Travel 55½ km in a southeasterly direction from Paris, and you’ll reach Fontainebleau, a commune which actually covers a larger area than Paris itself. So it’s pretty big. Fontainebleau is known for its forest, and its château which has been developed over the centuries by successive French kings.

Kensington Palace

The second day of our London trip (we’re back-tracking a bit here…) started with a visit to Kensington Palace. I’d never visited Kensington Palace before, not that I can remember at least; and our hotel was just around the corner which didn’t hurt!

Fête de l’Europe // 13.05.17

Today, Connie and I, to celebrate Europe day, took a trip to the Hôtel de Ville in Paris. Europe Day was actually on the 9th May, but the weekends are always better times for these sort of things. The city had organised a fête outside the Hôtel with loads of activities, talks, and, most importantly, food based on/from the countries of the European Union.