Two Hours on the Royal Mile: Part 2

We’re back for part two in Scotland’s great capital: Edinburgh. When I left last time I was talking about some of the witchy goings-on throughout Edinburgh’s past, and I want to leap right back into it. So here goes!

REVIEW: ‘Alternative’ Afternoon Tea at The Wild Boar

I wasn’t entirely sure what to expect when my friend approached me with the idea of an ‘alternative’ afternoon tea. Hopefully not too off-the-wall that the all-important Scone with Clotted Cream had been taken off the menu! Rest assured, it is still there. I think I’m making a habit of going out for tasty afternoon teas on Sunday now, and long may it continue if they are all of the same standard as The Wild Boar.

REVIEW: Afternoon Tea at The Daffodil

My experience at The Daffodil started on a high note when I reversed my car into the parking space perfectly on the first try. Not a huge achievement in the grand scheme of things, but for me it rarely happens. Read into that what you will. It improved massively when the server led us to a table by a floor-to-ceiling window, letting the natural light stream in and giving us a smashing view of Grasmere. The hotel itself is a classic Lake District building from the outside. Even a one-time visitor to the area knows the look I mean – it’s all in the slate. It would be hard to believe that the hotel was built as recently as 2012 if not for the interior.

Big Ben boring you? Three Unusual Places to Visit in London – The Ditsy Explorer

It’s time for another guest post, but not just any guest post – The Ditsy Explorer a.k.a. Peta Bradwell is back! She’s brought together three of her more ‘off the beaten track’ London sights for those who have ‘been there, done that’ when it comes to the capital.

Two Hours on the Royal Mile: Part 1

Yes, you read that right: two hours. To add a bit of context, I wasn’t really in Edinburgh to sightsee. My family and I were there to see an afternoon performance of War Horse at the Festival Theatre and the two hours was really only a bit of spare time that I didn’t want to waste! Now obviously, it is impossible to see all the best parts of Edinburgh in two short hours, so I had to whittle it down slightly. In the end, while my mum and sister took on Harvey Nichols, my dad and I tackled the Royal Mile.

Elfreth’s Alley with Julia Dent

We’re heading back over to the USA for another guest post! This time, Julia Dent of Through Julia’s Lens, talks us through one of her favourite heritage sites in the City of Brotherly Love, Philadelphia. Over to Julia:

Sizergh Castle

Follow the winding driveway all the way to the end and you’ll reach Sizergh Castle. Well, you’ll reach the National Trust gift shop first, and then the castle, but you know what I mean! Despite being owned by the National Trust, Sizergh is still the home of the Strickland family, and they still pop back on occasion I’m told. It hasn’t always been in the hands of the Stricklands though. Sizergh Castle began life with the Deincourt family and remained that way until 1239 when Sir William de Strickland married Elizabeth Deincourt. And that, they say, was that.

Knutsford Royal May Day 2018

I don’t think there is any town more proud of its May Day than Knutsford, and rightly so. It has been a tradition in the town since 1864 when the Vicar of Knutsford at the time, Rev. Robert Clowes set it up. The ‘Royal’ part came about 23 years later when the title was bestowed upon it by the Prince and Princess of Wales, TRH Edward and Alexandra, who would become King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra further down the line. They visited the celebrations in 1887 which was the Golden Jubilee year of Edward’s mother and one of England’s most well-known monarchs, Queen Victoria.

The Old Courthouse Museum with Katie Klaassen

It’s time to say hello to another guest blogger on Holme & Away. This post is coming all the way from South Dakota, USA, an area with a shed-load of great stories and a fascinating history. Here to tell us about it is Katie Klaassen; take it away!

Wray Castle

Take a trip down the western side of Windermere and down a few narrow roads, and you’ll reach Wray Castle. Built in the 1840s, this new-gothic creation was the brainchild of James and Margaret Dawson, a Liverpudlian couple, who moved to the Lake District because, well, why wouldn’t you? Unlike other castles I have visited throughout the course of writing for this blog, Wray is a bit of a fib. It emits an air of old-world majesty and you could be tricked into thinking it was once lived in by Dukes and Earls of times gone by. The tarmac surrounding the building kind of dampens the charm, but it is still quite an imposing construction.