REVIEW: ‘Alternative’ Afternoon Tea at The Wild Boar

I wasn’t entirely sure what to expect when my friend approached me with the idea of an ‘alternative’ afternoon tea. Hopefully not too off-the-wall that the all-important Scone with Clotted Cream had been taken off the menu! Rest assured, it is still there. I think I’m making a habit of going out for tasty afternoon teas on Sunday now, and long may it continue if they are all of the same standard as The Wild Boar.

Elfreth’s Alley with Julia Dent

We’re heading back over to the USA for another guest post! This time, Julia Dent of Through Julia’s Lens, talks us through one of her favourite heritage sites in the City of Brotherly Love, Philadelphia. Over to Julia:

Sizergh Castle

Follow the winding driveway all the way to the end and you’ll reach Sizergh Castle. Well, you’ll reach the National Trust gift shop first, and then the castle, but you know what I mean! Despite being owned by the National Trust, Sizergh is still the home of the Strickland family, and they still pop back on occasion I’m told. It hasn’t always been in the hands of the Stricklands though. Sizergh Castle began life with the Deincourt family and remained that way until 1239 when Sir William de Strickland married Elizabeth Deincourt. And that, they say, was that.

Knutsford Royal May Day 2018

I don’t think there is any town more proud of its May Day than Knutsford, and rightly so. It has been a tradition in the town since 1864 when the Vicar of Knutsford at the time, Rev. Robert Clowes set it up. The ‘Royal’ part came about 23 years later when the title was bestowed upon it by the Prince and Princess of Wales, TRH Edward and Alexandra, who would become King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra further down the line. They visited the celebrations in 1887 which was the Golden Jubilee year of Edward’s mother and one of England’s most well-known monarchs, Queen Victoria.

The Old Courthouse Museum with Katie Klaassen

It’s time to say hello to another guest blogger on Holme & Away. This post is coming all the way from South Dakota, USA, an area with a shed-load of great stories and a fascinating history. Here to tell us about it is Katie Klaassen; take it away!

Wray Castle

Take a trip down the western side of Windermere and down a few narrow roads, and you’ll reach Wray Castle. Built in the 1840s, this new-gothic creation was the brainchild of James and Margaret Dawson, a Liverpudlian couple, who moved to the Lake District because, well, why wouldn’t you? Unlike other castles I have visited throughout the course of writing for this blog, Wray is a bit of a fib. It emits an air of old-world majesty and you could be tricked into thinking it was once lived in by Dukes and Earls of times gone by. The tarmac surrounding the building kind of dampens the charm, but it is still quite an imposing construction.

Ravenglass & Eskdale Railway

The vast majority of my Cumbria-based posts to Holme & Away are focused on locations in the Eden Valley, and the eastern side of the Lake District National Park. This time, I am venturing out and heading over to the West Coast of Cumbria, to the Ravenglass & Eskdale Railway. It is practically on the opposite side of the county to myself and sits roughly 18 miles south of Whitehaven.

Lowther Castle

A few weeks ago, I made a visit to another local attraction and historical gem, Lowther Castle. I have already visited the parkland surrounding the Castle when I went to Lowther Show, and I thought it high time that I visited the shell of the building that remains. In 2017, they opened a new exhibition taking the visitor on a journey from its Medieval beginnings to present day. Let me tell you, it is hugely interesting, and so I shall tell you its story… very briefly. The whole thing would take days!

Long Meg & Castlerigg

I’m kicking off 2018 with a visit to some slightly bizarre locations. Long Meg and her Daughters, and Castlerigg are two fairly well-known stone circles in Cumbria, and can be found near Little Salkeld and Keswick respectively.

Lanercost Priory

We’ve now reached the end (nearly) of 2017, and I have one last ‘real’ post to go before my festive hiatus. A few weekends ago, my friend, Amy, and I visited Lanercost Priory, near Brampton. The site has been a place of worship since the 12th Century, and it is now presented as a mix of ruin and functioning church. Like most places in the vicinity of the Scottish border, such as Carlisle Castle, it has a rocky history of raids and hardship; and, like Brougham Castle, there have also been a handful of royal visits.