Bootham Bar

A Day in York: Part 2

Let’s get back to York! When I left last time, I had touched on the first part of my walk through York’s history, beginning at Micklegate, and, to be honest, not much further. As I mentioned at the end of the post, my next stop was St. Mary’s Abbey in the Museum Gardens so that’s where we’ll pick up. I had been to the abbey ruins previously on a school trip, but I was more interested in being out of the classroom than the story at the time! Returning to it now I can appreciate it more, and despite essentially being a ruin in a park, what the remains represent is fascinating.

Two Hours on the Royal Mile: Part 1

Yes, you read that right: two hours. To add a bit of context, I wasn’t really in Edinburgh to sightsee. My family and I were there to see an afternoon performance of War Horse at the Festival Theatre and the two hours was really only a bit of spare time that I didn’t want to waste! Now obviously, it is impossible to see all the best parts of Edinburgh in two short hours, so I had to whittle it down slightly. In the end, while my mum and sister took on Harvey Nichols, my dad and I tackled the Royal Mile.

Elfreth’s Alley with Julia Dent

We’re heading back over to the USA for another guest post! This time, Julia Dent of Through Julia’s Lens, talks us through one of her favourite heritage sites in the City of Brotherly Love, Philadelphia. Over to Julia:

Sizergh Castle

Follow the winding driveway all the way to the end and you’ll reach Sizergh Castle. Well, you’ll reach the National Trust gift shop first, and then the castle, but you know what I mean! Despite being owned by the National Trust, Sizergh is still the home of the Strickland family, and they still pop back on occasion I’m told. It hasn’t always been in the hands of the Stricklands though. Sizergh Castle began life with the Deincourt family and remained that way until 1239 when Sir William de Strickland married Elizabeth Deincourt. And that, they say, was that.

Knutsford Royal May Day 2018

I don’t think there is any town more proud of its May Day than Knutsford, and rightly so. It has been a tradition in the town since 1864 when the Vicar of Knutsford at the time, Rev. Robert Clowes set it up. The ‘Royal’ part came about 23 years later when the title was bestowed upon it by the Prince and Princess of Wales, TRH Edward and Alexandra, who would become King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra further down the line. They visited the celebrations in 1887 which was the Golden Jubilee year of Edward’s mother and one of England’s most well-known monarchs, Queen Victoria.

Domaine de Chantilly

Roughly 40km north of Paris, you’ll find Chantilly, a commune that was once part of the historic Valois region. In May, I took a trip up to Chantilly for a plant festival in the grounds of the château, combining it with a nosey into the building itself. What I didn’t realise at the time was that the castle is now the home of the Musée Condé, which has one of the best collections in France.